Breakout Sessions


Session I

Tuesday, November 28, 1:30 - 2:30PM

 

Developing a Patient Engagement Strategy for Your Community

Improving health requires providers, patients, and their care circle working together. In today’s highly connected world, patients need and expect healthcare to be easily accessible, easy to navigate and personalized to fit their needs and goals. Improved engagement has been proven to improve health outcomes and information technology solutions can support engagement efforts by connecting patients, families and providers/care circles together. This session will explore patient engagement tactics and solutions and provide care study examples of success in this area.

  • Tamara Cull, DHA, MSW, LCSW, ACM and VP, Market Development, Medecision
     

Perspectives on Serious Illness Program Design and Implementation

What factors lead to successful serious illness management care programs? Effective implementation of serious illness care management requires understanding of rapidly changing healthcare systems delivering care to different patient populations. This session will cover the essential concepts needed to design a successful serious illness care program. It will discuss payment methodologies, patient identification options, staffing design considerations, outcome measurement, and other essential elements of successful program implementation. The teaching methodology will include presentation of key concepts illustrated in the Serious Illness Program Design & Implementation Framework.

C-TAC has collaborated with Healthsperien, the Betty Irene Moore School of Nursing at UC Davis, and the Petrie-Flom Center for Health Law Policy, Biotechnology, and Bioethics at Harvard Law School, with support from the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation, to incrementally develop a flexible Serious Illness Program Design and Implementation Framework (SIP Framework) consisting of the foundational elements of program design that contribute to program success. 

  • Khue Nguyen, PharmD, Chief Operating Officer, C-TAC Innovations
  • Samira Beckwith, CEO, Hope Healthcare
  • Lauran Hardin, Senior Director, Camden Coalition of Healthcare Providers
  • Will Kennedy, Senior Medical Director for Clinical Services, CareOregon
  • Theresa Schmidt, Vice President, Healthsperien


What do caregivers need most? Learnings from current research

Family caregivers provide most of the care for people with advanced illness. They are the lynchpin of our country’s ability to care, providing $470 billion annually in unpaid care. This volunteer force cannot feasibly be replaced with a paid workforce, yet family caregivers report extreme levels of stress that threaten their ability to continue. This session looks at recent research on what family caregivers report. Panelists will discuss findings and engage with the group on the most pressing needs of family caregivers, what solutions could meet those needs, and what indicators would be most helpful in assessing progress. 

  • Brandon Nuckolls, Business Strategy & Design, Cigna
  • C. Grace Whiting, Chief Operating Officer, National Alliance for Caregiving
  • Amber Slichta, Vice President of Programs, Ralph C. Wilson, Jr. Foundation
  • Susan Reinhard, RN, Senior Vice President, Director, AARP Public Policy Institute
  • Kristi Guillory, Senior Associate Director, Policy Development, Alzheimer's Association

 

A Community of Caring: Person and Family-Centered Program Design

This session will dive into the design, results and implementation of two exemplary programs that create a “community of caring”. Senior leadership from Respecting Choices and LifeCourse will describe how their collaboration provides a creative approach to meet the needs of individuals with advanced illness and their caregivers to ensure that care team members weave together strategies to deliver person-centered and family-oriented care. They will share their journey including opportunities, barriers, and the structure and processes they have used.

  • Brad Stuart, MD, Chief Medical Officer, C-TAC Innovations (moderator)
  • Linda Briggs, MSN, MA, RN, Director of Program Development and Research, Respecting Choices
  • Paige Bingham, Director, LifeCourseAllina
  • Anne Betzner, Director, Evaluation and Research, Children's HeartLink 
  • Vivian Anugwom, LifeCourse Program Manager, Allina


Session II

Tuesday, November 28, 2:30 - 3:30PM

 

Advanced Care Transformation Index

Each day, over 10,000 new enrollees enter Medicare, bringing with them a burden of illness that exceeds that of any other age cohort in the population. But they are not alone; the challenges of serious/advanced illness are evident throughout the population. C-TAC is committed to improving the care of all these individuals and their families. This session will present Version 1.0 of the Advanced Care Transformation Index, which will include measures from different domains that are agreed upon by experts in the field, and outline the thinking behind the inclusion and exclusion of certain indicators.

  • David E. Longnecker, MD, Chief Clinical Innovations Officer, C-TAC
  • John Mulder, MD, Chief Medical Officer, Trillium Institute
  • Wendy Prins, MPH, MPT, Quality Innovation, National Quality Forum
  • Karen Hirschman, NewCourtland Term Chair in Health Transitions Research, UPenn School of Nursing

 

The Devil’s in the Details: Implementing Palliative Care in an ACO Environment

With support from the Stupski Foundation, C-TAC is working with Blue Shield of California’s home-based palliative care program in the San Francisco Bay Area to develop guidelines, tools and best practices for payers and providers who are interested in adopting this model of care. This session presents on the process of identifying and implementing a home-based palliative care model, engaging key stakeholders, and lessons learned from this process.

The New Language and Scale of Advance Care Planning: How to Activate and Serve Hundreds of Millions

Advance care planning has established itself as the standard of care, but has not yet achieved the scalability to reach the hundreds of millions of Americans in need of advance care plans. This session will present major new language strategies to activate individuals and families, potential technology to generate and meet demand, and large-scale storage & retrieval possibilities to make quality, documented conversations the norm across the United States.

  • John Maycroft, MPP, Optum
  • Ryan Van Wert, Chief Medical Officer, Vynca
  • Tom Martin, Director, Innovation, AARP Services, Inc
  • Stephanie Anderson, Deputy Executive Director, Respecting Choices, Moderator

 

What do caregivers need most? Learnings from current research

Family caregivers provide most of the care for people with advanced illness. They are the lynchpin of our country’s ability to care, providing $470 billion annually in unpaid care. This volunteer force cannot feasibly be replaced with a paid workforce, yet family caregivers report extreme levels of stress that threaten their ability to continue. This session looks at recent research on what family caregivers report. The panelists will discuss the findings and engage with the group on the most pressing needs of family caregivers and what solutions could meet those needs.

  • Brandon Nuckolls, Business Strategy & Design, Cigna
  • C. Grace Whiting, Chief Operating Officer, National Alliance for Caregiving
  • Amber Slichta, Vice President of Programs, Ralph C. Wilson, Jr. Foundation
  • Susan Reinhard, RN, Senior Vice President, Director, AARP Public Policy Institute
  • Kristi Guillory, Senior Associate Director, Policy Development, Alzheimer's Insititute

Breakout Session III

Wednesday, November 29, 8:30 - 9:30 AM

 

Innovative Approaches in Advanced Illness Care​

Traditional approaches to healthcare delivery are changing rapidly. Numerous forces, ranging from consumer expectations to provider payment mechanisms, are driving the movement from provider-centric to value-centric care delivery. The move from volume to value, and the focus on outcomes rather than processes only, require healthcare providers to assume both greater risk and greater responsibility for the populations they serve.  Collectively, such approaches encourage providers to implement proactive care that delivers the Right Care, in the Right Place and at the Right Time.  This panel will illustrate innovative approaches that are used in three leading health systems to delivery better care that benefits both the providers and the recipients of that care.  Attendees can expect to learn of the challenges, opportunities and rewards that result from adopting this new paradigm for healthcare delivery, often to our most needy populations.

 

Aligning Payment Models with Effective Advanced Illness Care Management

Healthcare funding and reimbursements vary significantly. Effective advanced illness care management can greatly impact improved quality of life and healthcare spending reductions. This interactive session aims to provide clear overviews of reimbursement models and examines the current payment systems for advanced illness care and how they may evolve and fit into a value-based healthcare reimbursement climate. This discussion involves dynamic engagement of attendees in employing real-world examples in geographic regions and size of programs.

  • Khue Nguyen, PharmD, Chief Operating Officer, C-TAC Innovations (moderator)
  • Greg Gadbois, Medical Director, Priority Health
  • Brad Smith, Co-Founder and Chief Executive Officer, Aspire Health
  • Beth Mahler, Vice President, Clinical Transformation, Sutter Health
  • Phil Rodgers, University of Michigan Health System, Palliative Care Chair, AAHPM
  • Tanya Stewart, Senior Medical Director, United Health
     

African-American Faith Community Engagement in Person-Centered Advanced Illness Care

Too many African Americans in urban areas such as Baltimore (MD), Washington (DC), and Detroit (MI) experience multiple co-morbidities and are more likely to experience poorer quality care. Moreover, they are more likely to avoid or delay seeking advanced illness care, because of a general mistrust of health care providers and plans, negative experiences in the clinical environment, or the perception that the system is not invested in their personal values and goals.

The faith community, by virtue of its convening role in communities and as a provider of social, spiritual, and at times, medical care, is uniquely positioned to serve as a bridge of support between a wide array of stakeholders and family caregivers. Working with places of worship offers opportunities to develop longitudinal relationships with hard to reach populations, and for patients, family caregivers and faith communities, these partnerships offer the opportunity to ensure that their values, needs, and know-how -- rather than clinical protocol alone -- inform care delivery and new models of care. This session will highlight how three urban faith communities are positively impacting the advanced illness care movement by educating and mobilizing parishioners around the issue of advanced illness care. Additionally, this session will expose how African-American faith communities are advocating for comprehensive and accessible advanced illness services and resources

 

Applying Evidence for Advanced Illness Care

In this session, a panel of nationally recognized experts will provide their insights into evolution of the evidence base for the most effective and best strategies that individuals and their caregivers need to care for advanced illness.  The panel will also review current national guidelines and quality measures for advanced illness care and identify real-world examples of successful population health-level interventions.